Dr. Jeff Vidt Blog

Thromboembolism and Splenic Infraction

Thromboembolism is the process of blood clots forming in the cardiovascular system. These can remain stationary or can break loose and travel throughout the blood vessels eventually lodging in smaller capillary beds located in the lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys. Worse case scenarios involve clots ending up in the brain and heart which can rapidly lead to life threatening consequences. I have seen a syndrome of thromboembolism in Chinese Shar-Pei especially leading to splenic infarction or thromboembolism. In fact, the only breed I’ve seen this in during the last 26 years have been in Shar-Pei and only those suffering with...

Canine Health Information Center (CHIC)

The Board recently approved the participation of the CSPCA in the Canine Health Information Center program. Details of the program for our breed are given below. Overview CHIC is a centralized canine health database sponsored by the AKC Canine Health Foundation (AKC-CHF) and the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA). It was conceived in 1999 and became operational in 2001. Today there are 56 breeds involved through their parent clubs.  Goals The goals of the CHIC Program are: To work with parent clubs to identify breed health issues and help to establish a central information system concerning these health issues. To...

Influenza Type A Virus Dog Flu Outbreak

You may be hearing and reading a lot lately concerning reports of a new dog flu (influenza type A) virus which has caused outbreaks at Greyhound tracks throughout the country and now seems to be spreading into the general dog population. Here are some key points about the virus. It is an influenza virus and not bacterium. Thus it is not treatable with antibiotics. It is susceptible to two of the most common antiviral drugs, amantidine and Tamiflu. These drugs have not been licensed for use in dogs. The virus appears to have mutated from an influenza strain that affects...

Newsletter: Volume 9, Issue 1 September 2005

As many of you know I suffered a fractured heel bone at the end of May and have been recovering ever since. I’m still in physical therapy and realize an older body takes longer to heal. I want to thank you for your continued support, well wishes and help during this time. You have been patient in picking up your pets and putting them on the exam table for me, allowing me to sit down to do exams and waiting a little extra time for me to get medications, etc. Your help has been instrumental in my rehabilitation. Likewise I...

Newsletter: Volume 8, Issue 2 December 2004

I received information about a potential study to be done into the immunopathology of Familial Shar-Pei Fever/Amyloidosis in the Shar-Pei. I’m giving the Shar-Pei fancy in this area a heads up as I will be relying on you and your dogs to help with blood samples. Samples would be collected from the following groups of dogs: 1. Adult Shar-Pei dogs with an FSF history but no current symptoms. 2. Healthy adult Shar-Pei dogs with no history of FSF that have not had recent vaccinations or any clinical signs of infectious disease within the previous month. Approximately 20 mls of peripheral...

Newsletter: Volume 8, Issue 1 June 2004

The E.R.D.-Screen™ Urine Test I’ve been receiving many questions on the new E.R.D.-Screen™ Urine Test from Heska. I would make the following comments about the test: Amyloidosis in the Shar-Pei primarily affects the medulla (central part) or the urine concentrating region of the kidney and proteinuria (protein in the urine) is not a significant aspect of this syndrome. As amyloidosis can involve the glomeruli in the cortex (outer region of the kidney) and result in proteinuria the E.R.D.-Screen™ Urine Test may be useful here as an early detection test. The urine protein:creatinine ratio is still important in these cases as...

Autoinflammatory Disease

Introduction: Since the elucidation of the human and canine genomes our understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the inflammatory response has progressed at an exponential rate. We now realize that genes encode for proteins that serve as enzymes in biochemical pathways, as receptors on cell membranes, as chemical messengers in the body such as cytokines/chemokines and regulatory proteins which control various processes in the body — primarily the inflammatory response and the innate and adaptive immune responses. It is even more complex as some proteins (chemokine receptors) have a role as ‘silent’ (non-signaling) receptors which regulate inflammatory and immune reactions...

Amyloidosis

Amyloidosis is the deposition of an abnormal substance called amyloid in the tissues of the body. Amyloidosis is not a disease as much as it is a specific biochemical arrangement in which a precursor protein or protein fragment accumulates and forms filaments. These filaments align and stack themselves in a beta-sheet conformation forming fibrils that twist around each other and are deposited in the tissues as amyloid deposits. Amyloid deposits differ due to the nature of the protein precursors that form there. Due to this structure amyloid is insoluble and can be thought of as “wax”. There are currently at...

AKC Canine Health Foundation Parent Club Health Conference

Report of the Health Committee – 2010 While it did not occur in 2010 the big news has been the release of the long awaited research report on the association of the “meatmouth” mutation copy number with FSF. Validation studies are currently underway to verify the usefulness of a genetic blood test to (1) predict the potential risk for FSF in a particular individual and (2) to help breed away from the “meatmouth” mutation. The article, “A Novel Unstable Duplication Upstream of HAS2 Predisposes to a Breed-Defining Skin Phenotype and a Periodic Fever Syndrome in Chinese Shar-Pei Dogs” was published...

Plan of Action for Amyloidosis

This article by Dr. Vidt presents a plan to monitor Shar-Pei with the goal of uncovering renal amyloidosis as early as possible and then instituting appropriate dietary and medical intervention. It does contain some technical terms which your veterinarian may be able to simplify for you. The author urges you to discuss this article with veterinarian and then both of you can work together in dealing with this troubling disease. Renal amyloidosis has hit the Shar-Pei fancy in recent years and left many of us feeling helpless as we watch young Shar-Pei sicken and die before our very eyes. We...