Dr. Jeff Vidt Blog

Newsletter: Volume 2, Issue 1 July 1998

Ear Problems and the Chinese Shar-Pei Shar-Pei have one of the most unique ear conformations in the dog world. The tight ear flap and a predisposition to narrow ear canals (“stenotic ear canals”) can spell disaster in trying to maintain a healthy ear. The normal ear anatomy is similar to an ice cream cone. The cone represents the vertical ear canal and this connects to a short horizontal ear canal which leads to the ear drum. Most problems involve the vertical ear canal. I consider it normal for the Shar-Pei to have what I call “yeast over growth”. This is...

Newsletter: Volume 2, Issue 1a April 1998

Spring time is heartworm testing time. Spring time is heartworm-testing time and I just want to briefly review the life cycle of the heartworm and the preventatives that are available. Heartworm disease is transmitted by the mosquito. An infected mosquito bites the dog and in the process of taking a blood meal, some of the baby heartworms (known as microfilaria) enter the dog through the bite wound. These microfilariae migrate in the tissues of the dog for 2-3 months undrgoing development and finally reach the heart and lungs where they mature into adult. Fertilized females produce microfilariae which are released...

Dietary Protein

Much progress has been made in clinical nutrition in the past decade especially in the area of nutrition in the kidney failure patient. This is still an area of controversy between clinicians and nutritionists, but research is providing more insight concerning the role of dietary protein in the management of the kidney failure patient. What I hope to do here is provide a digest of this current state of affairs and let you make your own decisions. There is a link between dietary protein levels and the clinical signs of kidney failure. Once dogs have developed signs of uremia such...

Newsletter: Volume 1, Issue 1 April 1997

Familial Shar-Pei Fever (FSF) Familial Shar-Pei Fever (FSF) is a disease that appears to be unique to the Chinese Shar-Pei breed. The chief clinical sign is a very high fever of short duration. The temperature generally runs between 105 – 107°F and lasts 12 – 36 hours. Often this is accompanied by painful swelling o one or both hock (ankle) joints in the rear legs. The hock is often very warm to the touch. It is important to remember that the hock swelling is an inconsistent feature of FSF – the fever is always present. The disease is hereditary and...